Grammar

Common Grammatical Errors: Examples and Corrections

Common Grammarly Errors Examples and Corrections

When we write, it’s important to use good grammar so people can understand us better. Even if we use tools like Grammarly to help, there are still some common mistakes that can happen. These mistakes might be with words that sound the same but mean different things, or maybe we put the wrong punctuation. These are called Grammatical errors. Fixing these mistakes is like making our writing smoother and clearer. In this discussion, we’ll look at some of these Common Grammatical Errors and learn how to make our writing better and easier to understand.

Common Grammarly Errors Examples and Corrections

Common Grammatical Errors Examples and Corrections

Common Grammatical errors:

Common  Grammatical errors refer to mistakes or deviations from the accepted rules and conventions of grammar in a language. People make mistakes when they talk or write. These mistakes can make it hard for others to understand what they’re saying. It’s important to try and fix these mistakes so that our messages are clear and right.

Types of Common Grammatical Errors:

  • Subject-verb agreement errors
  • Misplaced modifiers
  • Run-on sentences
  • Sentence fragments
  • Pronoun-antecedent agreement errors
  • Double negatives
  • Apostrophe misuse
  • Comma splice
  • Dangling modifiers
  • Incorrect verb tense

Subject-verb agreement errors:

Subject-verb agreement means that the subject and the verb in a sentence must match in number. In other words, if the subject is singular, the verb should be singular, and if the subject is plural, the verb should be plural.

Examples:

  • Incorrect: She don’t like pizza.

In this sentence, “She” is singular, but the verb “don’t” is plural. To fix this, we need to make the verb match the subject:

  • Correct: She doesn’t like pizza.

Now, both the subject “She” and the verb “don’t” are singular.

Remember, it’s like making sure the words agree and get along in number. If the subject is one person or thing, the verb should match with one form. If the subject is more than one, the verb should match with a different form.

Misplaced modifiers:

Imagine you have a sentence with a word or phrase that’s in the wrong place, and it makes the meaning confusing. That’s what we call a “misplaced modifier.

Examples:

  • Incorrect: Running down the street, my hat flew off in the wind.

In this sentence, it sounds like the hat is running down the street because the phrase “Running down the street” is next to “my hat.” However, I’m pretty sure it’s the person who’s running, not the hat. To fix it, we can move the modifier (the describing part) to the right place:

  • Correct: My hat flew off in the wind as I was running down the street.

Now it’s clear that the person is running, and the hat is flying off separately. So, a misplaced modifier is like when words are not in the right order, and it makes the sentence a bit confusing.

Run-on sentences:

A run-on sentence happens when two or more ideas are combined in a single sentence without proper punctuation. It’s like having too much information all jumbled together.

Examples:

  • Incorrect: I like to play basketball my friend prefers soccer.

In this example, two separate ideas are joined without proper punctuation. It’s a run-on sentence.

  • Correct: I like to play basketball. My friend prefers soccer.
    OR
     I like to play basketball, but my friend prefers soccer.

In the corrected versions, the ideas are separated either by a period or a conjunction to make the sentence clear and grammatically correct.

Sentence fragments:

A sentence fragment is like a piece of a sentence that’s not complete. It’s like having part of an idea but not the whole thing. Imagine you’re telling a story, but you only say part of what happened, and it doesn’t make sense on its own.

Examples:

  • Complete sentence: “I went to the store.”
  • Fragment: “Went to the store.”

See, the fragment is missing something. It’s not a complete thought because it doesn’t have a subject (who did the action) in this case.
So, to fix it and make a complete sentence, you could say: “I went to the store.” That way, you have a full idea, and it makes sense!

Pronoun-antecedent agreement errors:

The pronoun-antecedent agreement is like making sure that the words match up correctly in a sentence. A pronoun is a word like “he,” “she,” “it,” or “they,” and it stands in the place of a noun, which is a person, place, thing, or idea.
Now, the antecedent is the word that the pronoun refers to. So, pronoun-antecedent agreement means the pronoun has to agree with its antecedent in terms of number (singular or plural) and gender (if applicable).

Examples:

  • Incorrect: Each of the students brought their lunch.

In this sentence, “each” is singular, but “their” is plural. It’s like saying, “Each student brought their lunch.” The correct version would be:

  • Correct: Each of the students brought his or her lunch.

Now, it matches because “each” is singular, and “his or her” is also singular. This way, the pronoun agrees with its antecedent.

Double negatives:

Double negatives happen when two negative words are used in the same sentence, canceling each other out and creating a positive meaning. It’s a common mistake in English.

Examples:

  • Incorrect: I don’t need any help.
    Correct: I don’t need any help.
  • Incorrect: She didn’t say anything.
    Correct: She didn’t say anything.
  • Incorrect: I can’t find my keys anywhere.
    Correct: I can’t find my keys anywhere.

Remember, using double negatives can make sentences confusing, so it’s better to use only one negative word to express a negative idea.

Apostrophe misuse:

Apostrophe misuse happens when people use apostrophes incorrectly in writing.

Examples:

  • Incorrect: The cat’s are playing in the yard.
    Correct: The cats are playing in the yard.

The apostrophe shouldn’t be used for plural words like “cats.” Just say “cats” without the apostrophe.

  • Incorrect: I don’t know what for dinner.
    Correct: I don’t know what’s for dinner.

The apostrophe is used to replace the missing letter in “don’t” (short for “do not”) and to show possession in “what’s” (short for “what is”).

Comma splice:

A comma splice is a mistake that happens when two complete sentences (independent clauses) are joined together with just a comma, instead of using a proper connecting word or punctuation. It’s like trying to glue two sentences with only a comma, which is not the right way to do it.

Examples:

  • Incorrect: I like to read, I also enjoy watching movies.

Here, “I like to read” and “I also enjoy watching movies” are complete sentences. They are wrongly joined by a comma. To fix this, you can use a conjunction or separate them into two sentences:

  • Correct: I like to read, and I also enjoy watching movies.
    OR
    I like to read. I also enjoy watching movies.

So, remember, when combining two sentences, use a proper connecting word like “and,” or “but,” or use a semicolon (;) or period (.) instead of just a comma.

Dangling modifiers:

Imagine a dangling modifier as a word or phrase that’s not properly connected to the thing it’s supposed to describe in a sentence. It’s like a word that is left hanging, not knowing what it should be describing.

Examples:

  • Incorrect: Walking down the street, the flowers looked beautiful.

In this sentence, it sounds like the flowers are walking down the street because the “Walking down the street” part is not correctly connected to a person or thing.

  • Correct: Walking down the street, she saw that the flowers looked beautiful.

Now, it’s clear that “she” is the one walking down the street, and the flowers are what she sees as beautiful.

Incorrect verb tense:

Verb tense tells us when an action happened. Using the wrong tense can make sentences confusing.

Examples:

Past Tense when it should be Present:
Incorrect
: Yesterday, I eats pizza.
Correct: Yesterday, I ate pizza.

Present Tense when it should be Past:
Incorrect
: Last week, she is at the park.
Correct: Last week, she was at the park.

Future Tense when it should be Present:
Incorrect
: Tomorrow, he will play video games.
Correct: Tomorrow, he will play video games.

Remember, it’s important to match the tense of your verbs with the time you are talking about.

Common Grammarly Errors Examples and Corrections

Common Grammatical Errors Examples and Corrections

Errors and Corrections:

1. Incorrect: “The team are working hard on the project.”
     Correct: “The team is working hard on the project.”

2. Incorrect: “She almost drove her kids to school every day.”
     Correct: “She drove her kids to school almost every day.”

3. Incorrect: “I like pizza I could eat it every day.”
     Correct: “I like pizza. I could eat it every day.”

4. Incorrect: “Hiking in the mountains, the view was breathtaking.”
 Correct: “Hiking in the mountains, I found the view breathtaking.”

5. Incorrect: “Hiking in the mountains, the view was breathtaking.”
     Correct: “Hiking in the mountains, I found the view breathtaking.”

6. Incorrect: “She likes reading, swimming, and to hike.”
     Correct: “She likes reading, swimming, and hiking.”

7. Incorrect: “I don’t need no help.”
     Correct: “I don’t need any help.”

8. Incorrect: “I brought my new shoes to the beach.”
     Correct: “I bought my new shoes for the beach.”

9. Incorrect: “Its a beautiful day.”
     Correct: “It’s a beautiful day.”

10. Incorrect: “Although it was raining.”
    Correct: “Although it was raining, we decided to go for a walk.”

Common Grammarly Errors Examples and Corrections

Common Grammatical Errors Examples and Corrections


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