Grammar

Dependent Clauses Definition, Types with Examples

Dependent Clauses Definition, Types with Examples

Let’s talk about sentences in grammar! There’s a special type called the Dependent Clause. It needs help from an Independent Clause to make complete sense. Dependent Clause types are complex and compound-complex. Complex is like a sidekick, and compound-complex involves many working together. This setup is crucial for good communication, letting us share ideas, actions, or descriptions effectively. It’s important to use these clauses well to speak clearly and make sense in English. So, remember, sentences can be like buddies working together, and getting the hang of it helps us express ourselves better.

Dependent Clause Definition, Types with Examples

Dependent Clause Definition

What is the Dependent Clause?

A dependent clause is a group of words that contains a subject and a verb but cannot stand alone as a complete sentence. It relies on an independent clause to form a complete thought. Unlike independent clauses, dependent clauses cannot function independently because they lack the necessary information to express a complete idea. They often begin with subordinating conjunctions like “because,” “although,” or “when,” linking them to the main clause. In simpler terms, a dependent clause needs support from another part of a sentence to make sense and convey a complete meaning.

Definition of Dependent Clause:

A dependent clause is a group of words in a sentence that cannot stand alone as a complete sentence. It relies on an independent clause to make sense and convey a complete thought. It often starts with words like “because,” “although,” or “when.

Examples:

  • Although it was raining, they went for a walk.
  • They stayed inside because it was too cold.
  • I’ll go to the store if you need anything.
  • She can’t go to the party unless she finishes her homework.
  • Since it’s your birthday, we’ll celebrate.
  • We’ll go hiking wherever the trail leads us.
  • Before you leave, let me know.

Types of Dependent Clause:

There are three types of dependent clauses:

  • Adjective (Relative) Clauses
  • Adverb Clauses
  • Noun Clauses

Noun Clause:

A noun is a person, place, thing, or idea. So, a noun clause is like a little team of words that functions as a single unit, and you can use it in a sentence where you would normally use a noun.

Examples:

  • What she said surprised everyone.
  • I don’t know where he went.
  • The teacher explained why the experiment failed.
  • I wonder who will win the competition.
  • That he lied was obvious from the start.
  • The team is concerned about whether they will qualify for the playoffs.
  • She couldn’t understand what he meant by his remarks.

Adverb Clause:

An adverb clause is a group of words that function as an adverb in a sentence. It typically begins with a subordinating conjunction such as when, where, since, while, although, if, or because. The main purpose of an adverb clause is to provide information about the verb in the main clause, answering questions like how, when, where, why, or under what conditions.

Examples:

  • When I finish my work, I will go for a walk.
  • I’ll come over after I complete my chores.
  • She smiled because she won the game.
  • Although it was raining, they went for a picnic.
  • I’ll study with you until I understand the material.
  • He went to bed early since he had an early meeting.

Adjective (relative) Clauses:

Adjective (relative) clauses are subordinate clauses that function as adjectives within a sentence. They provide additional information about a noun, helping to identify or describe it more specifically. These clauses are introduced by relative pronouns such as “who,” “whom,” “whose,” “which,” or “that.”

Examples:

  • The car that was parked in front of the house is mine.
  • She is reading a book that was recommended by her friend.
  • The cake that my grandmother baked is delicious.
  • The person who won the award is a talented artist.

Dependent Clause Examples

  • Because she was tired, she decided to take a nap.
  • Although it was raining, they continued with the outdoor event.
  • When the sun sets, the sky becomes a canvas of colors.
  • If you study hard, you will perform well in the exam.
  • Since they missed the bus, they had to walk to school.
  • Wherever you go, I will be there to support you.
  • As the storm approached, we secured the windows and doors.
  • While I was cooking dinner, the phone rang.
  • Because the traffic was heavy, they arrived at the party late.
  • If the power goes out, we have a generator as a backup.
  • Since they forgot their umbrellas, they got soaked in the rain.
  • Whenever the bell rings, the students know it’s time to change classes.
  • After the concert ended, the audience applauded for an encore.
  • While the baby slept, the parents quietly prepared dinner.
  • Since she had an early meeting, she went to bed early the night before.
  • If you water the plants regularly, they will thrive in the garden.
  • Though they practiced diligently, they still didn’t win the championship.

Dependent Clauses Exercise:

1. Which of the following is a subordinate conjunction that introduces an adverbial dependent clause?
a) and
b) but
c) because
d) or
2. Identify the type of dependent clause in the sentence: “Although it was raining, they decided to go for a walk.”
a) Adjective clause
b) Adverbial clause
c) Noun clause
d) Independent clause
3. In the sentence, “I will help you if you help yourself,” the underlined portion is a:
a) Noun clause
b) Adjective clause
c) Adverbial clause
d) Independent clause
4. Choose the correct dependent clause in the sentence: “The book that she lent me is fascinating.”
a) Adjective clause
b) Adverbial clause
c) Noun clause
d) Independent clause
5. Which subordinating conjunction is used to introduce a conditional dependent clause?
a) unless
b) while
c) since
d) whenever
6. Identify the dependent clause in the sentence: “He studied hard because he wanted to succeed.”
a) Noun clause
b) Adjective clause
c) Independent clause
d) Adverbial clause
7. What type of dependent clause is present in the sentence: “Whoever finishes first can leave early.”
a) Adjective clause
b) Adverbial clause
c) Noun clause
d) Independent clause
8. Choose the correct dependent clause: “I know the reason why he is upset.”
a) Adjective clause
b) Noun clause
c) Adverbial clause
d) Independent clause

Answers:

  • c) because
  • b) Adverbial clause
  • c) Adverbial clause
  • a) Adjective clause
  • a) unless
  • d) Adverbial clause
  • a) Adjective clause
  • b) Noun clause

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