Grammar

Subject-Verb Agreement Rules and Examples

Subject-Verb Agreement Rules and Examples

Have you ever read a sentence that just didn’t sound right? It might be because of something called subject-verb agreement. But don’t worry, it’s not as tough as it sounds. Imagine it as a word pairing game where the subject (the who or what) and the verb (the action word) need to be a team. When they match, your sentences make sense and are easy to understand. Why is this important? Because it makes your writing clear and effective.

To make it even simpler, keep an eye out for special keywords like “is,” “are,” “has,” “do,” and “go.” These words tell you whether the subject is one thing or more than one. Once you get the hang of these words, you’re on the right track to getting your sentences just right.

In this blog post, we’ll explore different situations where subject-verb agreement matters. We’ll tackle those moments when it might seem a bit tricky. Whether you’re a student, a budding writer, or just someone who wants to improve their language skills, understanding subject-verb agreement is like having a superpower for better communication. So, let’s dive in together, and by the end, you’ll be a pro at crafting sentences that are clear and sound perfect!

Subject-Verb Agreement Rules and Examples

Subject-Verb Agreement

What is Subject-Verb Agreement?

Subject-verb agreement is the grammatical rule that requires the subject of a sentence and the verb to match in number. In other words, a singular subject should be paired with a singular verb, and a plural subject should be paired with a plural verb.

Basic Rules

1. Singular Subjects:
Use a singular verb with a single thing or person.

Examples:
The cat runs.
A dog barks.

2. Plural Subjects:
Use a plural verb with multiple things or people.

Examples:
Birds fly.
Cars drive.

3. Compound Subjects:
When two subjects are connected by “and,” use a plural verb.

Examples :
Apples and bananas are delicious.
Tom and Jerry laugh.

4. Compound Subjects with “or” or “nor”:
If one part is singular, use a singular verb. If both parts are plural, use a plural verb.

Examples:
Neither the cat nor the dog is hungry.
 Either the apples or the oranges are ripe.

5. Collective Nouns:
Use a singular or plural verb depending on whether the group acts as one or as individuals.

Examples:
The team wins together.
The team argue among themselves.

6. Indefinite Pronouns:
Use a singular verb with words like “everyone” and “somebody.”
Examples:
Everyone enjoys cake.
Somebody knows the answer.

7. Indefinite Pronouns:
Exceptions
:

Words like “all” and “most” can be singular or plural depending on context.

Examples:
All the candy is gone.
 All the books are interesting.

8. Expressions of Quantity:
Words like “many” and “a lot of” take a plural verb.

Examples:
Many kids play outside.
 A lot of cats purr.

9. Nouns with Prepositional Phrases:
The verb matches the subject, not the phrase’s object.

Examples:
The group of friends is coming.
The box of toys has vanished.

10. Titles and Names:
Organizations or titles usually use a singular verb.

Examples:
Microsoft creates software.
The book is interesting.

11. Subjects that End in “S”:
Singular nouns ending in “s” can be singular or plural depending on meaning.

Examples:
The news is on TV.
The news are shocking.

12. “There” as a Subject:
The verb matches the noun following “there.”

Examples:
There is a cat on the roof.
There are three apples on the table.

13. Intervening Phrases:
Ignore words between the subject and verb.

Examples:
The man, with his hat, is friendly.
The kids, including Alice, play.

14. Indefinite Articles:
“A” and “an” always use a singular verb.

Examples:
A book is interesting.
An apple tastes sweet.

15. “Each” and “Every”:
Use a singular verb with “each” or “every.”

Examples:
Every student works hard.
Each child receives a gift.

Subject-Verb Agreement with Quiz

  1. She __________ (walk/walks) to school every day.
  2. The students __________ (is/are) studying for their exams.
  3. He and his friends __________ (was/were) excited about the trip.
  4. The cat, as well as the dog, __________ (play/plays) in the garden.
  5. Each of the books __________ (is/are) interesting.
  6. They, along with their parents, __________ (go/goes) to the zoo.
  7. The beautiful flowers in the garden __________ (blossoms/blossom) in spring.
  8. Neither of the options __________ (is/are) suitable.
  9. My favorite band __________ (perform/performs) live next week.
  10. The new video games __________ (has/have) fantastic graphics.

Now, let’s see how you did:

  1. She walks to school every day.
  2. The students are studying for their exams.
  3. He and his friends were excited about the trip.
  4. The cat, as well as the dog, plays in the garden.
  5. Each of the books is interesting.
  6. They, along with their parents, go to the zoo.
  7. The beautiful flowers in the garden blossom in spring.
  8. Neither of the options is suitable.
  9. My favorite band performs live next week.
  10. The new video games have fantastic graphics.

Examples of Subject-Verb Agreement 

  • The cat sleeps.
  • My friends are nice.
  • She runs fast.
  • The book is interesting.
  • The birds sing.
  • John and Sarah dance well.
  • The profits have grown.
  • The captain was honored.
  • The students need to study.
  • Neither the dog nor the cat likes being alone.
  • She sings beautifully.
  • The cat purrs softly.
  • They play soccer every weekend.
  • He reads novels frequently.
  • The birds chirp in the morning.
  • She dances gracefully.
  • I study English every day.
  • He runs marathons.
  • The sun rises in the east.
  • We swim in the ocean.
  • You write compelling stories.
  • They drive to work together.
  • The dog barks loudly.
  • She paints stunning landscapes.
  • I cook dinner every evening.
  • They laugh heartily.
  • He speaks several languages.
  • The flowers bloom in spring.
  • We eat dinner at 7 PM.
  • The students study hard for exams.
  • She travels frequently.
  • The computer works perfectly.
  • You watch interesting documentaries.
  • He practices the guitar daily.
  • They argue often.
  • The car races down the track.
  • I listen to music on my commute.
  • The baby cries at night.
  • She exercises regularly.
  • We hike in the mountains.
Subject-Verb Agreement with Exercise
  • The sun (shines/shine) brightly.
  • The boy (plays/play) with his toys.
  • The cake (tastes/taste) delicious.
  • The car (runs/run) smoothly.
  • The birds (sing/sings) sweetly.
  • Sarah (reads/read) a book.
  • The dog (barks/bark) loudly.
  • The flowers (smell/smells) lovely.
  • Tom and Mary (are/is) happy.
  • The students (study/studies) hard.
  • The baby (cries/cry) when hungry.
  • The ball (rolls/roll) down the hill.
  • The cookies (taste/tastes) great.
  • The teacher (teaches/teach) the class.
  • The sky (is/are) blue.
Subject-Verb Agreement Rules and Examples

Subject-Verb Agreement


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