Grammar

Comparative Adjectives, Types with Examples In English

Comparative Adjectives Types with Examples

Words like ‘belonging to,’ ‘your,’ and ‘his’ are handy for talking about things in grammar We call them ‘Comparative Adjectives.’ They tell us who has something. These words make our sentences more interesting. This blog talks about these special words in grammar, and the different kinds of them, with Comparative adjective examples to help you get it easily. It’s not tricky, so whether you’re a student learning English grammar or just curious about words, this will help you a lot. These words make sentences better, and you can learn how to use them in grammar to make your English better too!

Comparative Adjectives Types with Examples

Comparative Adjectives Types with Examples

Comparative Adjective:

They make it easy to talk about what’s bigger, smaller, faster, or slower. When we use these words, it makes our sentences more interesting and clear. Learning about comparative adjectives helps us express our thoughts better. In English, most comparative adjectives are formed by adding the suffix “-er” to the adjective, or by using the word “more” before the adjective.

Examples:

  • Big / Bigger:
    The elephant is bigger than the mouse.
  • Fast / Faster:
    She runs faster than him.
  • Intelligent / More Intelligent:
    Sarah is more intelligent than John.
    Note that some comparative adjectives don’t follow the standard “-er” or “more” pattern and have irregular forms. For example:
  • Good / Better:
    This book is better than the one I read last month.
  • Bad / Worse:
    The weather today is worse than yesterday.
  • Far / Farther or Further:
    The store is farther/further away than I thought.

Types of Comparative Adjectives:

  • Regular Comparative Adjectives
  • Irregular Comparative Adjectives
  • One-Syllable and Two-Syllable Adjectives
  • Adjectives with Two or More Syllables
  • Ending in -y Adjectives
  • Adjectives Ending in -er, -ow, -le
  • Adjectives with Three or More Syllables

Regular Comparative Adjectives:
Regular comparative adjectives are formed by adding the suffix “-er” to short adjectives or by using the word “more” before longer adjectives.

Examples:

  • Short Adjectives with “-er”:
    Big: The elephant is bigger than the mouse.
    Fast: She runs faster than him.
    Tall: John is taller than his sister.
  • Short Adjectives with “More”:
    Happy: She is more happy today than yesterday.
    Sad: It’s getting more sad as the story unfolds.
    Bright: The morning seems more bright after the rain.

In summary, when dealing with short adjectives, you can often create the comparative form by adding “-er.” For longer adjectives, use “more” before the adjective.

Irregular Comparative Adjectives:
Irregular comparative adjectives do not follow the typical pattern of adding “-er” or “more” to form the comparative degree. Instead, they have unique comparative forms.

Examples:

  • This book is good, but that one is better.
  • Yesterday’s weather was bad, but today’s is worse.
  • The store is farther/further away than I expected.
  • She has less time today than she did yesterday.

One-Syllable and Two-Syllable Adjectives:
One-syllable adjectives, like “big” and “fast,” are concise, while two-syllable adjectives, such as “simple” and “happy,” add a layer of complexity. Comparing degrees involves using “more” for two-syllable adjectives, broadening expressive possibilities in English language communication.

Examples:

1. One-Syllable Adjectives:
These adjectives are short and consist of only one syllable.

Big: The elephant is bigger than the mouse.
Fast: She is a faster runner than him.

2. Two-Syllable Adjectives:
These adjectives are a bit longer, containing two syllables.

Simple: The solution is simpler than I expected.
Happy: After the news, she felt happier than before.

The difference lies in the number of syllables, with one-syllable adjectives being shorter and two-syllable adjectives having a slightly longer structure.

Adjectives with Two or More Syllables:
Adjectives with two or more syllables often form their comparative degree by using the word “more” before the adjective.

Examples:

  • This book is more interesting than the one I read last month.
  • The designer handbag is more expensive than the one I bought last year.
  • The sunset is more beautiful than the sunrise.
  • The new sofa is more comfortable than the old one.

In these examples, you can observe that adjectives with two or more syllables take on the comparative form by using “more” before the adjective. This pattern is consistent for most multi-syllable adjectives.

Ending in -y Adjectives:
Adjectives ending in “-y” typically change the “-y” to “-ier” or “-iest” when forming the comparative and superlative degrees.

Examples:

  • Happy:
    Comparative: Happier
    Superlative: Happiest
  • Busy:
    Comparative: Busier
    Superlative: Busiest
  • Pretty:
    Comparative: Prettier
    Superlative: Prettiest
  • Easy:
    Comparative: Easier
    Superlative: Easiest

In these examples, you can see the transformation of the “-y” ending to “-ier” for the comparative form and “-iest” for the superlative form.

Adjectives Ending in -er, -ow, -le:
Adjectives ending in -er, -ow, and -le often change when forming their comparative forms.

Examples:

-er Adjectives:
These adjectives typically add “-er” to the base form. The main word is bolded.
Example: TallTaller

-ow Adjectives:
Adjectives ending in -ow often double the final consonant before adding “-er.” The main words are bolded.
Example: Slow → Slower

-le Adjectives:
Adjectives ending in -le might drop the -e and add “-er” in the comparative form. The main words are bolded.
Example: Gentle → Gentler

These changes are part of the process of forming comparative adjectives in English.

Adjectives with Three or More Syllables:
Adjectives with three or more syllables often use “more” in the comparative form.

Examples:

Important
Comparative: More important
Example: This project is more important than the previous one.

Delicious
Comparative: More Delicious
Example: The homemade cake is more delicious than the store-bought one.

Comparative Adjectives Examples:

  • The mountain trail is narrower than the wide forest path.
  • Her laptop is more expensive than mine.
  • This novel is more interesting than the one I read last week.
  • Winter days are shorter than summer days.
  • The cheetah is known for being the world’s fastest land animal.
  • Learning a new language can be more challenging than expected.
  • The red dress looks better on you than the blue one.

Comparative Adjectives Exercise:

1. Which of the following is the correct comparative form of the adjective “happy”?
a) more happy
b) happer
c) happier
d) happyer
2. What is the comparative form of the irregular adjective “far”?
a) far
b) more far
c) farther or further
d) farer
3. Choose the correct comparative form for the adjective “expensive.”
a) expensiver
b) expensivest
c) more expensive
d) expensiver
4. Which adjective has an irregular comparative form?
a) old
b) beautiful
c) tall
d) good
5. What is the comparative form of the adjective “simple”?
a) simpler
b) more simple
c) simplest
d) simplier
6. Select the correct comparative form for the adjective “busy.”
a) busyer
b) busiest
c) more busy
d) busier
7. Which of the following is the correct comparative form for the adjective “difficult”?
a) more difficult
b) difficulter
c) difficulter
d) difficultest

Answer:

  1. c) happier
  2. c) farther or further
  3. c) more expensive
  4. d) good
  5. a) simpler
  6. d) busier
  7. a) more difficult

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